benefits of mature trees

Over 1,100 Trees Live at Campland

The Benefits of Mature Trees

Campland on the Bay® planted over 1,160 trees in the early 1970’s.  These 36 varieties of mature trees benefit the environment by:

  • Supporting wildlife by supplying habitat for birds, insects, and wildlife.
  • Providing oxygen and taking in carbon dioxide through the process of photosynthesis
  • Absorbing massive amounts of carbon. 100 trees remove 53 tons of carbon dioxide and 430 pounds of other air pollutants per year.[1]
  • Helping to control climate by moderating the effects of the sun, rain, and wind.[2]
  • Enhancing the aesthetics and providing shade of our resort.
  • Preserving and enhancing soil.
  • Producing fruits and nuts.

Trees matter to the nation’s greenhouse gas balance sheet and expanding the reserve could be a cost-effective way to help decarbonize the economy.[3]

[1] United States Department of Agriculture – “Benefits of Trees

[2] SaveATree.com – “Why Trees?”

[3] Resources.org –  “Tree Planting, Land Use, and Forest Climate Benefits by David N. Wear”

Facts About Trees for Kids Video

Importance of Trees Video

Trees are Life-Saving Infastructure

Do you know why?

According to American Forests.org

"Our health, wealth, and general well-being depend in part on having trees around us -- from our backyards to large forests. Tree across the U.S. absorb 17.4 million tons of air pollutants, preventing 670,000 cases of acute respiratory symptoms annually."

Trees Lower Utilities Bills

How tree save us money.

According to American Forests.org

"Nationwide in the U.S., trees reduce energy use for heating and cooling by 7.2% on average." Besides offering shade, trees also serve as wind breaks.

Trees Provide Employment

There are jobs in forestry.

According to American Forests.org

"Trees are a source of income from jobs related to tree maintenance and making products out of reclaimed wood. For every $1 million invested in urban forestry, 25 forest-related jobs are created. That number is 40 for jobs related to larger forest landscapes."

Learn About the Trees of Campland

Aleppo-pine-tree

Aleppo Pine Tree

Pinus halepensis
Native to the Mediterranean

Bark is orange-red, thick and deeply fisured at the trunk. Pine cones are narrow and 2 - 4.7 inches long. It can grow up to 82 ft. tall.

Brisbane Box Tree

Brisbane Box Tree

Lophostemon confertus
Native to Australia

Evergreen tree grows up to 60 ft. Good shade tree as grows wide canopy with dome like shape. Dense foliage with dark green leathery leaves. Rarely sheds limbs. Photo credit David Gress.

Bottlebrush tree

Bottlebrush Tree

Callistemon citrinus
Native to New South Wales, Australia

Known for its showy red flower spikes (looks like it could be used use to clean a bottle). This shrub grows up to 20 ft. tall. Leaves smell lemony when crushed.

Camphor tree

Camphor

Cinnamonum camphora
Native to South China, Taiwan, South Japan

Evergreen tree grows up to 98 ft. Leaves have a glossy, waxy appearance and smell of camphor when crushed. Camphor is used as incense and as a medicine, and insect repellant.

Canary Island Pine Tree

Canary Island Pine

Cupaniopsis anacardioides
Native to Australia, Papau New Guinea

Grows up to 40 ft. tall. Drops marble-sized orange fruit. Bark is light gray, rough. Tree has rounded shape. Grows 12 - 24 inches per year. Lives up to 150 years. Photo credit: K. Dave - TheSpruce.com

carrotwood tree

Carrotwood

Lophostemon confertus
Native to Australia

Evergreen tree grows up to 60 ft. Good shade tree as grows wide canopy with dome like shape. Dense foliage with dark green leatherly leaves. Rarely sheds limbs.

deodar cedar

Deodar Cedar

Pyrus kawakamii
Native to Taiwan, China

Has showy white flowers. Bark is dark brown or light green, blocky or furrowed. Leaves are elliptic to ovate. Grows up to 30 feet. Rate of growth 24 - 36 inches per year.

Evergreen Pear

Evergreen Pear

Cinnamonum camphora
Native to South China, Taiwan, South Japan

Evergreen tree grows up to 98 ft. Leaves have a glossy, waxy appearance and smell of camphor when crushed. Camphor is used as incense and as a medicine, and insect repellant.

incense cedar tree

Incense Cedar

Calocedrus decurrens
Native to Eastern Asia & Western North America

This tree grows 70 - 90 feet tall. Lives up to 150 years. Has scalelike evergreen leaves. Drops small to medium sized red or brown cones. Bark is brown, fibrous and furrowed.

deodar cedar

Indian Laurel Fig/Chinese Banyan

Ficus Microcarpa
Member of the fig tree family, it is widely planted as a shade tree. Used in traditional medicine. In Japan, the bark, aerial roots, and dried leaves are used against pain and fever. In China, it is used for the flu, malaria, bronchitis, and rheumatism. It is an antioxidant, has antibacterial, anti-carcinogen and anti-diabetic agents.

ironwood tree

Ironwood

Olneya tesota
Native to U.S./Mexico borderlands

This woody legume is found in washes and hillside drainages in the Sonoran Desert. It is one of the most ecologically important plants as it is a "nurse plant" that benefits flora and fauna. (Photo credit: Image by Mark Dimmitt.)

jacaranda tree

Jacaranda

Jacaranda mimosifolia
Native to Tropical Americas

Known for their fragrant purple flowers in the spring and summer. Name is South American origin, meaning fragrant. The wood has been used in dying and in medicine.

Japanese Black Pine tree

Japanese Black Pine

Ficus Microcarpa
Member of the fig tree family, it is widely planted as a shade tree. Used in traditional medicine. In Japan, the bark, aerial roots, and dried leaves are used against pain and fever. In China, it is used for the flu, malaria, bronchitis, and rheumatism. It is an antioxidant, has antibacterial, anti-carcinogen and anti-diabetic agents.

kaffir boom coral tree

Kaffir Boom Coral

Erythrina caffra
Native to South Africa

Known as the “flame tree” it produces large showy orange or red flowers that are thorny. Seeds are poisonous. Grows up to 40 feet. Provides nice canopy of shade. Known as the tree of Los Angeles.

lemon scented gum tree

Lemon Scented Gum Tree

Corymbia citriodora
Native to Australia

Light green leaves when crushed smell of cit-ronella and lemon. Oil distilled from the leaves is used in purfume and as a misquito repellant. Smooth trunk varies in color from white to coppery pink to pale yellow. Grows up to 160 ft. tall. Rate of growth up to 36+ inches per year.

Metrosideros excelsa

Metrosideros Excelsa

aka pōhutukawa
Native to New Zealand

Known as the New Zealand Christmas tree, this evergreen tree produces a brilliant display of red flowers, each consisting of a mass of stamens. It grows up to 82 feet tall, spreading in a dome-like form.

Mexican fan palm

Mexican Fan Palm

Mexican washingtonia
Native to Western Sonora & Baja California, Mexico

This ornamental palm can live up to 150 years. The palms are shaped like fans.The leaves have been used for rooofs, baskets and sandals while the fiber was used in making cord. Grows up to 100 ft. tall.

myoporum

Myoporum

Myoporum
Native to New Zealand

This fast growing shrub is unique because it has transparent dots in the leaves which are visible when held to a light. Also known as ngaio, this small tree grows up to 30 feet tall.

Norfolk pine tree

Norfolk Island Pine

aka pōhutukawa
Native to New Zealand, Southern Australia

A species of conifer, this tree was first sighted by Captain James Hook in 1774 in the South Pacific. The straight trees wood was suitable for masts and yards for sailing ships. A slow growing tree, it reaches heights up to 210 feet.

Pomegranate tree

Pomegranate Tree

Punica granatum
Native to the Mediterranean Region

This fruit-bearing deciduous shrub grows between 16 - 33 feet tall. Pomegranates are used in baking, cooking, juice blends, meal garnishes, smoothies, and alcoholic beverages, such as cocktails and wine.

punk tree

Punk Tree

Melaleuca quinquenervia
Native to New Caledonia, Papua New Guinea & E. Australia

AKA Broad Leaf Paperbark. Leaves used as a medicinal tea. The paper-like bark was used traditionally for making coolamons, shelter, wrapping baked food and lining ground ovens. Nectar can be used as a beverage. Timber used for fences. Has showy pink, purple or yellow flowers. Attracts birds and bees.

Pygmy date palm

Pygmy Date Palm

Phoenix roebelinii
Native to Southeast Asia

Small, multi-trunked palm that branches from base and grow up to 25’. This popular ornamental plant is effective at removing common household air toxins formaldehyde and bezene.

Red Ironbark Eucalyptus

Red Ironbark Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus sideroxylon
Native to Eastern Australia

Grows up to 90 ft. tall. Rate of growth 36 inches or more. Leaves are bluish green or silver or gray green. Flowers are pink, red or rose colored. Bark is black or red brown, blocky, or furrowed.

Rusty Fig Leaf

Rusty Leaf Fig

Ficus rubiginosa
Native to Eastern Australia

It’s a strangling fig that begins life as a seedling that grows on other plants. Bark is dark to light gray, rough our smooth. Bears small yellow or mostly green fruit. Grows up to 50 ft. tall.

sago palm tree

Sago Palm

Phoenix roebelinii
Native to Japan

This slow growing palm is a popular plant for landscapes. The pith contains edible starch, and is used for making sago. It must be washed of toxins before used.

Scrub pine tree

Scrub Pine

Pinus virginiana
Native to U.S. from Southern New York to Western Tennessee and Alabama

Grows on poor soils to size up to 59 feet. Some trees have twisted trunks. Pine has short yellow-green needles that are also twisted.

Shamel Ash Tree

Shamel Ash

Fraxinus uhdei
Native to Mexico and Central America

In the 1920s, Archies Shamel introduced the trees to California. This tree is fire resistant. Often planted along streets. Has a rounded shape and grows up to 80 feet. Lives 50 to 150 years.

Shiny Xyolma

Shiny Xyosma

Grevillea Robusta
Native to Eastern Australia

Fast-growing evergreen with a single main trunk. Bark is dark grey and furrowed. Leaves are fern-like. The strong wood is resistant to wood rot so used for furniture, cabinets and fences.

Silky Oak Tree

Silky Oak

Eucalyptus sideroxylon
Native to Eastern Australia

Grows up to 90 ft. tall. Rate of growth 36 inches or more. Leaves are bluish green or silver or gray green. Flowers are pink, red or rose colored. Bark is black or red brown, blocky, or furrowed.

Southern Magnolia tree

Southern Magnolia

Magnolia Grandiflora
Native to Southern U.S.

Medium to large evergreen with a single main trunk. Known for its showy large lemon-cintronella scented white flowers. This tree has a long history in the Southern US.

stone pine tree

Stone Pine

Grevillea Robusta
Native to Eastern Australia

Fast-growing evergreen with a single main trunk. Bark is dark grey and furrowed. Leaves are fern-like. The strong wood is resistant to wood rot so used for furniture, cabinets and fences.

Torrey Pine tree photo

Torrey Pine

Eucalyptus sideroxylon
Native to Eastern Australia

Grows up to 90 ft. tall. Rate of growth 36 inches or more. Leaves are bluish green or silver or gray green. Flowers are pink, red or rose colored. Bark is black or red brown, blocky, or furrowed.

Travelers palm tree

Travelers' Palm

Ravenala
Native to Madagascar.

It's called the Travelers’ palm because the sheaths of the stems hold rainwater. The huge paddle-shaped leaves grow in a distinct fan shape aligned in a single plane. They produce large white flowers.

Weeping Chinese Banyan Tree photo

Weeping Chinese Banyon

Ficus microcarpa
Native to China, tropical Asia and Austalia

Planted as a shade tree, it is from the fig tree family. The largest tree known is 110 feet tall, has a 250 ft. crown spread, with over 1,000 aerial trunks coming down.

white mulberry tree

White Mulberry Tree

Morus alba
Native to China, Korea, Japan

Mulberries are fast-growing when young and can grow up to 80 ft. tall. The leaves are alternately arranged, simple, and often lobed and serrated. In folk medicine, the berries were used to treat ring worm.